Painting > New Work

Gwendolyn Zabicki, Gwen Zabicki, painter, Chicago artist, Zabicki
oil on canvas
28 x 21 inches
2017
Gwendolyn Zabicki, Gwen Zabicki, painter, Chicago artist, Zabicki
oil on canvas
28 x 21 inches
2017
Gwendolyn Zabicki, Gwen Zabicki, painter, Chicago artist, Zabicki
oil on canvas
28 x 21 inches
2017
Gwendolyn Zabicki, Gwen Zabicki, painter, Chicago artist, Zabicki
oil on canvas
48 x 32 inches
2017
Gwendolyn Zabicki, Gwen Zabicki, painter, Chicago artist, Zabicki
oil on canvas
2017
Gwendolyn Zabicki, Gwen Zabicki, painter, Chicago artist, Zabicki
oil on canvas
48 x 16 inches
2017
Gwendolyn Zabicki, Gwen Zabicki, painter, Chicago artist, Zabicki
oil on canvas
2017
Gwendolyn Zabicki, Gwen Zabicki, painter, Chicago artist, Zabicki
oil on canvas
36 x 32 inches
2017
Gwendolyn Zabicki, Gwen Zabicki, painter, Chicago artist, Zabicki
oil on canvas
46 x 36 inches
2017
Gwendolyn Zabicki, Gwen Zabicki, painter, Chicago artist, Zabicki
oil on canvas
46 x 36 inches
2017
Gwendolyn Zabicki, Gwen Zabicki, painter, Chicago artist, Zabicki
oil on canvas
22 x 31 inches
2017
Gwendolyn Zabicki, Gwen Zabicki, painter, Chicago artist, Zabicki
oil on canvas
2017
Gwendolyn Zabicki, Gwen Zabicki, painter, Chicago artist, Zabicki
oil on canvas
15 x 22 inches
2017
Gwendolyn Zabicki, Gwen Zabicki, painter, Chicago artist,
oil on canvas
32in x 48in
2016
Gwendolyn Zabicki, Gwen Zabicki, painter, Chicago artist,
oil on canvas
22in x 15in
2016
Gwendolyn Zabicki, Gwen Zabicki, painter, Chicago artist, Zabicki
oil on canvas
22in x 31in
2017
Gwendolyn Zabicki, Gwen Zabicki, Gwendolyn Zabicki painting, Gwen Zabicki painting, Gwen Zabicki art, Gwendolyn Zabicki art, Gwen Zabicki artist, Gwen Zabicki artist, Gwen Zabicki Chicago, Gwendolyn Zabicki Chicago
oil on canvas
20in x 36in
2016
Gwendolyn Zabicki, Gwen Zabicki, Gwendolyn Zabicki painting, Gwen Zabicki painting, Gwen Zabicki art, Gwendolyn Zabicki art, Gwen Zabicki artist, Gwen Zabicki artist, Gwen Zabicki Chicago, Gwendolyn Zabicki Chicago
oil on canvas
16in x 20in
2016

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, women still do the majority of housework. The numbers have not changed since the BLS began tracking this data in 2003. This feminized work (e.g. cleaning, managing a home and delegating household responsibilities) involves no pay and goes largely unnoticed. In Pat Mainardi’s essay from 1970 titled, “The Politics of Housework,” she outlines the ways many so-called enlightened men try to avoid doing their fair share of housework. She writes, “A great many American men are not accustomed to doing monotonous, repetitive work which never issues in any lasting, let alone important, achievement... It is a traumatizing experience for someone who has always thought of himself as being against any oppression or exploitation of one human being by another to realize that in his daily life he has been accepting and implementing (and benefiting from) this exploitation.”

These paintings deal with the many daily, tedious and nearly invisible systems that women put in place in order to maintain a clean and functioning household. These systems are thrifty, practical, and innovative such as using old pairs of underpants as dust rags, cleaning mirrors with vinegar, having separate dish towels and hand towels, storing and reusing plastic bags, making sock balls, keeping a mental list of all the groceries in the home and when they might run out, and pouring boiling water on dish sponges to kill odors.

These paintings deal with surface-- shiny polished wood, streaky wet mirrors, wrinkled plastic bags, and porous sponges. They also reflect what is just beneath that surface-- that women give their families thousands of hours of unpaid physical and emotional labor. Learning to paint is about learning to see-- to notice the hue, saturation, and value of the objects around us. But I would add that painting is also about learning to acknowledge the things that are right in front of us and to care about them.